Customized Product Comparison Table

There is one really important aspect of improved conversions: when you let the user drive their own experience they convert at a higher rate.

Drip.com understands this. When you go to their comparison page instead of showing a table with 3 pre-selected competitors Drip allows users to select the competitors they want to compare Drip against, thus improving the relevancy of the comparison.

This is how the page looks when you first get to it (https://www.drip.com/comparison):

Drip_Default.png

And this is what I see after I add my 2 selections (Pardot and MailChimp):

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Time and Conversion Rates

People are kinetic creatures. We are never stagnant. Our views and behaviors change based on outside stimuli, whether that’s the time of day, what side of the bed we woke up on, or, are we hungry? You’d think these things wouldn’t have any effect on important things like our jobs or the future of others but you’re wrong. In a study, the US National Academy of Sciences published findings of parole judges in Israel. In brief, at the beginning of the day, and right after lunch, a prisoner coming up for parole had a 65% chance of going free. Before lunch and towards the end of the day, the chances dipped to close to zero. If hunger affects the supposedly concrete rule of judges, it can be assumed that mere mortals have a similar predisposition to irrational behavior. Websites can change their message to great effect based on the time of day or the day of the week because assumptions on human behavior can be made.

Hungry_Judges.jpg

For example, someone’s on a site at 2 AM on a Friday night trying to buy something. You can assume that this person has been out and there’s a credit card burning a hole in their pocket. What messaging tweaks should be made to the site to capitalize on this?

Is this the same behavior as someone coming to a site on 8AM on a Monday morning from a computer browser? This person doesn’t have all the time in the world. They’re popping in for a second before work because they have some time, or is it a mobile device which means they’re commuting on the train and have all the time in the world to kill. Is a conversion going to be made before they get to work? How does the site adapt to these situations?

Because a site can know where you are and the device you’re coming from, it’s possible to tell seemingly insignificant details. Where you are? What time it is? What the weather’s like there? All these factors can be brought to play when it comes to changing the message on the site.

Quick View: Don’t Believe Everything You Read

Many sites show QUICK VIEW option on category pages. The idea, I guess, is to help the shopper buy directly from the category page. See red arrow in screenshot below:

LLB_Quick_View.png

On click:

LLB_Quick_View_Activated.png

Is there evidence these actually improve conversion rates? Based on the research (https://baymard.com/blog/ecommerce-quick-views) I’ve seen, and experienced firsthand, they likely have a negative impact.

This reminds me of homepage image rotators/sliders that are also very popular. Spoiler alert: those don’t work either.

But Things Have Always Been Done This Way

Coming up with new ideas is hard and the brain is lazy. So when we think of new ideas the brain shouts, “But things have always been done this way”. I’m sure Nikki Sylianteng had those same thoughts when she got thinking about parking signs, which, by the way, are confusing as heck. But Nikki didn’t let the norm hold herself back.

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Learn more @ http://nikkisylianteng.com/project/parking-sign-redesign/

Shopper Discounts Explained

Retailers give discounts to shoppers to nudge them to buy. On the face of it, one would assume discounts are the best way to improve conversation rates. But, it’s being done so much shoppers have become desensitized by discounts.

When buyers see that an item has been discounted $50 they disregard the discount amount and just look at the final price. So, whether the markdown is $2 or $50, it’s not taken into consideration, it’s ignored.

The solution? Grab the user’s attention by explaining why the discount is being given.

When you offer the shopper an explanation for why something has been discounted, it not only gets read, it improves conversion rates.

Check out the example we threw together for you below (we added the text why we’re discounting $36):

Discount_Explanation_Blog_Sample_A

When “Why we’re discounting $36” is clicked we’ll show this popup message:

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