Retail, in the eyes of the everyday customer

new ideas and thoughts about the online retail world

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Reducing Terms and Conditions Friction

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Most sites have a checkbox for Terms and Conditions:

checkbox-required.png

This increases friction because the user has to take an action (clicking the checkbox).

On Indeed.com the message just states that if the main action button on the page is clicked (in this case Send) user is automatically accepting terms:

Indeed- Privacy Policy, Terms of Service.png

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December 5, 2016 at 6:45 am

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If You Have a Sense of Humor, Use It

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Hat tip to Paige Kusmierz for sharing this great Spirit Airlines (spirit.com) email blast. Love their sense of humor (read text at bottom of screenshot):

spirit-com_email

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November 28, 2016 at 5:14 am

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What’s More Valuable: Email Address or Phone Number?

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Noticed something new on mobilehomepartsstore.com. On their site footer they have this overlay:

mobilehomepartsstore_com_overlay

I was a little surprised because normally sites ask for my email address. I never considered the option of asking for the customer’s phone number. And now that I think about it, it seems like this could be a very effective tactic.

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November 21, 2016 at 5:41 am

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Improving Review Response Rates

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We already know the direct correlation between review count and conversion rates.

And when it comes to soliciting reviews the most effective tactic is to appeal to the shopper emotionally. Saw a brilliant example during a recent Uber ride (this was attached to driver seat headrest):

Review.png

PS: I gave the driver 5 stars.

Written by betterretail

November 14, 2016 at 6:25 am

Difficult Choices Kill Conversion Rates

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We think choices are good, but if you don’t clearly describe the differences between choices you are most definitely hurting conversion rates. Consider this: A shopper is looking to buy a wireless temperature sensor for their grill. They land on https://store.weber.com/accessories/category/igrill-products/1640 product page:

weber_product_page

The item sounds impressive and within their price range. But now the shopper notices a second option called iGrill® mini and it’s priced lower:

Weber_Mini.png

The shopper is viewing this page on their mobile phone (small screen) and they’re switching back and forth between the 2 options to understand why the mini is cheaper. They like the lower price but a voice in their head says, “what’s the catch here?”

And unless they clearly understand why the mini is cheaper they aren’t going to buy.

It turns out that the difference between the 2 models are the number of probes you get. But in the 10 minutes I was playing on these 2 product pages I simply couldn’t figure it out.

I’m not the sharpest knife in the drawer, but neither are many of your potential customers. You aren’t designing experiences for the smartest shoppers, you’re designing them for average, easily distracted shoppers.

Here is an idea: add a piece of code so that if a shopper first visits iGRILL® 2 page and then goes to iGrill® mini, on mini page we add new bolded content under product description that says:

The difference between iGRILL® 2 and iGrill® mini is that with iGrill® mini you get just 1 probe slot and with iGRILL® 2 you get 2 probe slots.

This would make my choice clear.

Written by betterretail

November 7, 2016 at 7:17 am

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Show Your Personality Every Chance You Get

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John Bonini is a copywriter. He uses his site johnbonini.co to market his copywriting services (it’s all serious business stuff). The site lists testimonials. One of those testimonials is by his mother:

John_Testimonials.png

It’s such a sweet touch. Lesson: Just because you are in the all serious business of being an online retailer doesn’t mean you shouldn’t use humor and humanness to connect with your customers.

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October 31, 2016 at 6:02 am

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Breaking Convention is Really Hard

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In 2007 1% Google users clicked I’m Feeling Lucky button:

google_im_feeling_lucky

I’m sure that number is even lower today. Yet, all rational reasoning aside, Google still leaves it there. Why? Because I’m Feeling Lucky was there from the earliest days of Google. They’re attached to it.

What widgets and features do you have on your site purely for nostalgia? Should they be removed?

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October 24, 2016 at 6:13 am

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