Stories Matter

If you have the ability to tell an amazing story you can mark-up some things 1,200%, even candy floss. And story isn’t just words, it’s also the packaging. Check out Bag of Unicorn Farts:

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Sells on Amazon for $10.95:

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And people who buy it aren’t enraged that they could by the same quantity of cotton candy for 20 cents. No, they’re deliriously excited:

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This is the top review rated by buyers of Bag of Unicorn Farts. Not the seller, but the damn buyers:

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You can buy Bag of Unicorn Farts here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01E9D0OR2/ref=cm_gf_ss_d_d_p_aH_i0_bt20_p0_qd2

Happy holidays.

Redundancy

On the top half of snapcorrect.com home there are 2 prominent links:Snapcorrect_HP.png

Clicking either one takes you to the same result page (https://snapcorrect.com/assessment). But isn’t that a bad idea, you ask? Isn’t homepage real estate prime? Why repeat the same message but word it differently?

Actually, what SnapCorrect is doing is clever. The tactic is called redundancy. Having just one link could mean that maybe 15% of homepage visitors would reach https://snapcorrect.com/assessment. But by showing the link twice 35%+ of homepage visitors will reach snapcorrect.com/assessment page.

Customized Product Comparison Table

There is one really important aspect of improved conversions: when you let the user drive their own experience they convert at a higher rate.

Drip.com understands this. When you go to their comparison page instead of showing a table with 3 pre-selected competitors Drip allows users to select the competitors they want to compare Drip against, thus improving the relevancy of the comparison.

This is how the page looks when you first get to it (https://www.drip.com/comparison):

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And this is what I see after I add my 2 selections (Pardot and MailChimp):

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Time and Conversion Rates

People are kinetic creatures. We are never stagnant. Our views and behaviors change based on outside stimuli, whether that’s the time of day, what side of the bed we woke up on, or, are we hungry? You’d think these things wouldn’t have any effect on important things like our jobs or the future of others but you’re wrong. In a study, the US National Academy of Sciences published findings of parole judges in Israel. In brief, at the beginning of the day, and right after lunch, a prisoner coming up for parole had a 65% chance of going free. Before lunch and towards the end of the day, the chances dipped to close to zero. If hunger affects the supposedly concrete rule of judges, it can be assumed that mere mortals have a similar predisposition to irrational behavior. Websites can change their message to great effect based on the time of day or the day of the week because assumptions on human behavior can be made.

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For example, someone’s on a site at 2 AM on a Friday night trying to buy something. You can assume that this person has been out and there’s a credit card burning a hole in their pocket. What messaging tweaks should be made to the site to capitalize on this?

Is this the same behavior as someone coming to a site on 8AM on a Monday morning from a computer browser? This person doesn’t have all the time in the world. They’re popping in for a second before work because they have some time, or is it a mobile device which means they’re commuting on the train and have all the time in the world to kill. Is a conversion going to be made before they get to work? How does the site adapt to these situations?

Because a site can know where you are and the device you’re coming from, it’s possible to tell seemingly insignificant details. Where you are? What time it is? What the weather’s like there? All these factors can be brought to play when it comes to changing the message on the site.