Getting Better Quality Reviews

Let’s look at these 2 reviews:

A: Generic and just adds cognitive load:

Chubbies_Review.png

B: Specifically addresses shopper concern about mattress delivery to buildings (Narrative Control):

Review_Leesa.png

Which one do you like better?

Instead of sending out a generic post-purchase email that says, “Hope you are enjoying product X, please write a review” study the product and the reviews you have already collected. Is there a feature that isn’t talked about enough? Is there a feature that is unfairly criticized by a tiny minority? You can identify 15 such scenarios specific to you.

Now that you have the most promising ideas craft a review request email.

Look at an example CAMINO CARRYALL 35 on Yeti.com is marketed as a rugged bag. But most of the reviews don’t talk about that feature. So what can one do? Simple, send an email to people who purchased the bag in the last 6 months. Here is my example email:

Subject: Camino Carryall is rugged, right?

Hi, Steve.

You’ve had your Camino Carryall for the last 6 months. We hope you’re using the heck out of it. We also hope you’ve been rough with it because ruggedness is a feature engineered into the bag. But you know what? We have 853 reviews and only 6 talk about the ruggedness of the product. That sucks because we went through 38 prototypes just to maximize ruggedness.

If you’ve taken the bag through the paces we would love your feedback on the ruggedness of the bag.

[review link]

We need your help, Steve.

Regards,
CEO

This email works for a number of reasons:

A: We’re asking Steve for a very specific thing
B: We’re challenging Steve to tip the balance of ruggedness reviews (they’re just 6 right now)

Getting More Email Signups

Shoppers have been trained to gloss over marketing messages, which means most will close this popup without noticing the 20% off coupon:

BabyBrezza_Demo_CONTROL.png

Video:

If I was working for BabyBrezza here is what I would have done …

To engage the user, slow them down, and notice the discount rate we’re using Challenge tactic. In our concept, this is the popup message the user will see:

BabyBrezza_Demo_Default.png

This is what is shown when the dropdown is clicked:

BabyBrezza_Demo_Dropdown.png

This is what we show when someone makes the wrong selection (very few will make the wrong selection):

BabyBrezza_Demo_Incorrect.png

And this is what we show when the user makes the right selection (most will get it right on the first try):

BabyBrezza_Demo_Correct.png

And when the user clicks Sign Up they’ll be shown the signup fields:

BabyBrezza_Demo_Sign_Up.png

Compared to the original popup our concept has more steps, which might feel like it’s adding friction. But remember, all friction isn’t bad. Sometimes one need to add friction to slow the user down so our marketing message has time to sink in.

Play on Magicmurals.com

Play is a tactic where you employ an interactive element to subliminally communicate your marketing message. Why go through the trouble of constructing an interactive element to pitch your marketing message? Because we’re living in a world saturated with marketing messages.

I’m going to use a made up example to show how a dash of Play can boost conversions (especially for first-time buyers).

Here is my video–

Written explanation:

What is currently being shown on lower half of homepage:

Control - Play.png

Here is the default state of our concept (using Play):

Default - Play.png

Here is what the user sees when they make the wrong selection:

Wrong - Play.png

Here is what is revealed when the user guesses correct:

Correct - Play.png

How “Play” Drives Conversions

There are 2 types of readers of my blog, people who prefer video and those who prefer the written format (I’m looking at your Lars).

Written format:

There are 7 levers (that I know of at this point in time) to influence potential shoppers. One of them is PLAY. Play is a tactic where you employ an interactive element to subliminally communicate your marketing message. Why go through the trouble of constructing an interactive element to pitch your marketing message? Because we’re living in a world saturated with marketing messages (if I had a penny every time I hear “we’re #1” I’d be 87 pennies rich). As a result, shoppers immediately discount marketing hyperbole (System 1 in action). If as a marketer you want to communicate your value prop you need to use PLAY. This is how contentsquare.com uses it:

1: This show this interactive element (notice how enticing it is):

ContentSquare_Default.png

2: Once you make a selection you’re shown this:

ContentSquare_Activated.png

3: Finally, the answer is revealed:

ContentSquare_Result.png

Guess what contentsquare.com specializes in solving for retailers??