How “Play” Drives Conversions

There are 2 types of readers of my blog, people who prefer video and those who prefer the written format (I’m looking at your Lars).

Written format:

There are 7 levers (that I know of at this point in time) to influence potential shoppers. One of them is PLAY. Play is a tactic where you employ an interactive element to subliminally communicate your marketing message. Why go through the trouble of constructing an interactive element to pitch your marketing message? Because we’re living in a world saturated with marketing messages (if I had a penny every time I hear “we’re #1” I’d be 87 pennies rich). As a result, shoppers immediately discount marketing hyperbole (System 1 in action). If as a marketer you want to communicate your value prop you need to use PLAY. This is how uses it:

1: This show this interactive element (notice how enticing it is):


2: Once you make a selection you’re shown this:


3: Finally, the answer is revealed:


Guess what specializes in solving for retailers??

Don’t Be Lazy This Holiday Season

During the holiday selling season websites typically add a sitewide design theme and/or message:


But they keep the rest of the site the same. For many sites, holiday selling is THE make/break part of their year.

Now, we know product page descriptions are THE single biggest conversion catalysts.

So, here is my question, why not rewrite your product page description around the holiday selling season? Tweak copy emphasis around themes like “treat yourself”, “amazing gift”, “celebrate”, etc.

I know what you’re thinking, “I have 561 SKUs, I can’t possibly rewrite every product page”.

Bad thought.

If you look at sales you’ll see 5 out of these 561 items drive a bulk of sales (also called Zipf’s Law). Surely, you’re not THAT busy that you can’t take out 4 hours to rewrite the description of a product page that drives 40% of annual sales.

To Grab Attention Present Things Differently

I really like this tactic being used on It all comes down to being unexpected. So many sites put the grand total of happy customers – this is expected. People will gloss over this. Why? Because shoppers’ brains are filtering out marketing speak.

This approach, on the other hand, makes the reader stop and think for a second because it interrupts the pattern we’ve gotten used to:


If You Want Feedback Remove All Friction

Received this great email from Lyft asking why I hadn’t used the service in a while. See screenshot and notes below screenshot:


Love this email for 4 critically important reasons:

1: It’s personalized to my actual behavior (“why have you not used Lyft since 6/14.”)

2: Headline makes it clear this is a quick email (“One-Minute Feedback”).

3: I just have to click one link to submit my response.

4: Lyft doesn’t send a ton of emails so I noticed this message.

No One Cares About the Next Order

On your PPC landing pages never show a popup that promises a saving on the second purchase:


Shoppers clicking paid search ads (excluding branded ads) have multiple tabs open and are reviewing multiple offers at the same time. They’re in “speed dating” mode. An offer that applies to their next purchase is a total waste. In fact, I’d argue, it hurts conversions because you’re reminding the customer that there is nothing special for them for this first purchase. And there might very well be a great deal available, or maybe your product is way better than the other tabs but the popup appeared moment I landed and now I’m turned off.