If You Want Feedback Remove All Friction

Received this great email from Lyft asking why I hadn’t used the service in a while. See screenshot and notes below screenshot:

Lyft_Survey.png

Love this email for 4 critically important reasons:

1: It’s personalized to my actual behavior (“why have you not used Lyft since 6/14.”)

2: Headline makes it clear this is a quick email (“One-Minute Feedback”).

3: I just have to click one link to submit my response.

4: Lyft doesn’t send a ton of emails so I noticed this message.

No One Cares About the Next Order

On your PPC landing pages never show a popup that promises a saving on the second purchase:

PPC_LP.png

Shoppers clicking paid search ads (excluding branded ads) have multiple tabs open and are reviewing multiple offers at the same time. They’re in “speed dating” mode. An offer that applies to their next purchase is a total waste. In fact, I’d argue, it hurts conversions because you’re reminding the customer that there is nothing special for them for this first purchase. And there might very well be a great deal available, or maybe your product is way better than the other tabs but the popup appeared moment I landed and now I’m turned off.

The 4 Forces

If you’re a marketer you need to tattoo this in your mind. The diagram below is used to understand the forces that are at play when a consumer is considering purchasing a new product or service:

Therewiredgroup.com.png

The 4 forces are:

– The Push of the Current Situation
– The Pull of the New Solution
– The Anxiety of the New Solution
– The Allegiance to the Current Situation

It’s a framework used by The Re-Wired Group.

Why Curiosity Matters

Bob Moesta is a curious person. He was involved in home building and selling condos. His condos were designed based on the stated needs of their target audience (ranch style, 2 bedroom, 2.5 bath, granite countertops, hardwood floor, etc.) But still, a big percentage of interested people didn’t pull the trigger.

Bob wanted to understand why.

He discovered people who were moving into this condo were moving from bigger homes and were anxious about the downsizing process. They simply didn’t know how to pack up 20 to 30 years of stuff that had been collected. Important, nostalgic stuff. They didn’t know how to purge collected memories. So people would say things like, “Boy, we don’t know how we’re going to downsize. We’ll need to cancel on the condo because we need another year to figure out how to downsize”.

Here is what Bob did: he raised the price of the condo and included (in price of condo) moving plus 2 years of storage. Result? Sales went up 17%.

Be more like Bob when thinking about your ecommerce business.

Choreographed User Experiences

We all know how important user experiences are. But what about choreographed user experiences? They’re even more important. Let me explain …

Imagine you’re an author who has written an excellent mystery novel with 12 chapters. Would you let your readers read the chapters in any order they please (chapter 8 followed by chapter 2)? Or would you demand that they read starting in sequence, from chapter 1?

It’s very similar for your ecommerce site. Yes, we want to give our visitors freedom to explore our store as they like but make no mistake about it, the sequence in which potential first-time buyers consume your story has a dramatic impact on their overall conversion rates.

Don’t know what the magic sequence is? Here is a template that can be applied to any site:

— The first content first-time buyers need to see is why your product/service is unique.

— The second content first-time buyers need to see if what makes you unique (your story).

— The third content first-time buyers need to see is why they should trust you.

— The fourth content first-time buyers need to see if what happens if the promise you are making isn’t true (risk reversal).

As marketers, we need to ensure all engaged potential first-time buyers “buy” this content (and in that sequence).


If you like ideas to boost your conversion rates you should subscribe. You can either email subscribe (option at bottom right corner of the screen) or follow me on Twitter (https://twitter.com/BetterRetail).

Focus on Just 2 things

Marketing is a boundless playground and you can drive yourself nuts trying every flavor of the moment. So you need to narrow your focus. After nearly 8 years of testing I can tell you the only 2 things that matter are answering these 2 questions:

1: How can we do a better job converting first-time buyers?

2: What caused a first-time buyer to place their first order?

These are the only 2 questions that matter. Period.

First_Time_Buyer.png

The 1st question requires a telescope mindset. We’re looking at a big data set and picking up patterns. You will find a lot of valuable data in your Google Analytics.

The 2nd question requires a microscope mindset. It doesn’t matter if your site generates 2 or 45 first-time purchases in a month. What matters is if you specifically understand why transaction ID #4566 occurred. It’s really important we talk to these brave first-time buyers. They have taken a leap of faith on you and we need to understand what switch happened in their mind that caused them to make that leap. There are many forces that push the ‘almost’ shopper to quit, and it’s our job to understand how transaction ID #4566 overcome those opposing forces to place their first order.

These 2 questions are strongly related. By better understanding Question 2 you can better answer Question 1.